We were given two eyes. Most of us take this fact for granted. There is a strong assumption that if both eyes are open, then we are looking through both. This may not be true. Certain measurements show that 65 percent of persons lack the full integration potential of simultaneously looking through both eyes. Let’s explore why do we have two eyes and is there a deeper meaning than science provides.

Did you know that looking through both eyes follows a developmental sequence? At birth, there is much less coordination between the eyes than at 12 months.  The process of two eye integration, called binocularity, continues through the first six years and maybe even beyond.

Also, were you aware that certain life experiences, like stress, emotional ‘woundedness’ and conditioning can result in a partial suppression of looking through one eye?  It appears that a breakdown in binocularity can be considered a protection of certain perceptions. Since the primary role of the brain is to protect us, it makes total sense when we perceive a situation that is difficult to manage, the brain can help by partially blocking out some of the view. This internal process can be measured with precision using clinical tools.

One such instrument is in a stereoscopic device, with a target named the Van Orden Star.Van Orden sample

While looking into the instrument, the left eye sees the left side and visa versa. The test is to choose similar patterns and then with a pen stylus draw the lines until they appear to meet.  The top diagram is a relatively good binocularity with some instability. The lines ideally meet at the horizontal position at the 0 point, and the same for both eyes. 

This tool is great since it reveals the double process of vision, that is central looking and peripheral seeing. The foundation for binocularity. In the bottom drawing it is clear that the level of binocularity is way less. This person has a strabismus, a crossed eye. The left turning in more. In her projection view, she saw exactly what the top person saw, except her result is very different.

It is one thing to analyse this information in a strictly visual science manner.  That is the person on the bottom would probably benefit from vision therapy, and then they would better see through both eyes and the drawing would also improve.  On the other hand, if greater binocularity is possible, and it happens, what inner shift in perception would be necessary? If a suppression of one eye and/or a turning of the eye is a survival strategy, then wouldn’t it be prudent to find out the cause of the suppression and combine this approach with vision therapy?

Another way of looking at this situation is to ask the question, what will the person see, and have to face, when they are looking through both eyes? What aspects of their life would they see that they may have previously denied or avoided? Are they emotionally strong enough to face the pending changes as they enter into the depth of seeing with higher levels of binocularity?

Consider this for a moment. Is it possible that our two eyes give us the possibility to enter into greater and greater depths within ourselves. That through experience, we discover our potential for wisdom.  To have a view of life that is less materialistic based and more connected to the very essence of our spirit.

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